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Caroline Racine

Ph.D.

Assistant Adjunct Professor
Radiation Oncology and Neurosurgery

University of California San Francisco
505 Parnassus Ave, Suite L-08
San Francisco, CA94143
Phone: 415-353-7130
Fax: 415-353-8679
Email: Caroline.Racine@[at]ucsf.edu

Professional Focus

Dr. Racine is a licensed clinical neuropsychologist, and currently holds the title of Assistant Professor in the Departments of Neurological Surgery and Radiation Oncology.  She performed her graduate work at  Washington University in St. Louis, and completed a PhD in Clinical Psychology with specific training in neuropsychology and aging.  She did an internship in Neuropsychology at Duke University Medical Center, and subsequently was a postdoctoral fellow in Neuropsychology from 2005 to 2007 at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in the Department of Neurology. She was a junior faculty member in Neurology from 2007-2009 where she focused on the clinical evaluation of individuals with dementia, movement disorders, and multiple sclerosis and had research interests in Parkinsonian dementia syndromes and the effects of healthy aging on white matter and cognition.

Dr. Racine recently joined the Department of Neurosurgery with a joint appointment in Radiation Oncology to develop the first of its kind Neuropsychology  Division within our Department.  The goal of this service will be to provide clinical and research assessments of cognition and mood and to make recommendations for intervention.

In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Racine is very interested in continuing to participate in research and is available to act as a collaborator for projects that have a specific cognitive and neuropsychiatric component.  For example, she will be working on various quality of life issues with our Neuro-Oncology group.  In the Department of Radiation Oncology, she will be working with Dr. Igor Barani, conducting research examining the cognitive effects of radiation therapy. She is also currently involved in projects examining the effects of DBS on cognition in patients with dystonia and Parkinson's disease. Dr. Racine is also dedicated to education and looks forward to becoming part of the medical training curriculum in both departments.