Head and Neck Cancer Trials

 

Study Title

A Phase ll study of Radiation Therapy and Vismodegib, for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

Principal Investigators

Study Number

VISMO-122011

Status of Trial

Open

Why is this study being done?

Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery are standard treatments for basal cell carcinoma at most institutions. The purpose of this study is to determine whether adding vismodegib to radiation (chemoradiotherapy) is safe and tolerable. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability of combined radiation therapy and vismodegib. This combination may increase the chances of the tumors being destroyed or unable to spread to other parts of the body in people with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

 

Contact

Arla Yost, MSc, CCRP
Email: Arla.Yost@ucsf.edu
Phone: 415-514-9603


 

Study Title

Randomized Phase II and Phase III Studies of Individualized Treatment for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Based on Biomarker Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA).

Principal Investigators

Study Number

NRG-HN001

Status of Trial

Open

Why is this study being done?

This study is being done to see how people with your type of cancer respond to different types or levels of chemotherapy, based on a specific viral marker in their blood. This viral marker is called the Epstein Barr virus, (EBV). A more individualized approach to treating your type of cancer might be found using this blood marker.

 

Contact

Arla Yost, MSc, CCRP
Email: Arla.Yost@ucsf.edu
Phone: 415-514-9603


Study Title

A Randomized Phase II Trial for Patients with p16 Positive, Non-Smoking Associated, Locoregionally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer.

Principal Investigators

Study Number

NRG-HN002

Status of Trial

Open

Why is this study being done?

Previous studies of your type of cancer have shown high rates of cancer control but result in many short and long term side effects when treated with high dose radiation and chemotherapy. Recently, investigators have noticed similar high rates of cancer control in small numbers of patients who receive less intensive treatments using lower doses of radiation with or without chemotherapy. It is expected that the side effects of treatment with lower doses of radiation would be less. For this reason this study is looking at two different ways of reducing the intensity of your treatment.

The purpose of this study is to compare any good and bad effects of using lower dose radiation therapy and chemotherapy to using lower dose radiation therapy alone. This study will allow the researchers to know whether these different approaches are better, the same, or worse than the usual approach. To be better, the study approach should result in the same survival rate of the usual approach (about 85 out of 100 patients alive and free of cancer at five years) but with less long term side effects.

 

Contact

Arla Yost, MSc, CCRP
Email: Arla.Yost@ucsf.edu
Phone: 415-514-9603